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SharonODonnell400

Sharon O’Donnell, a native North Carolinian, is a graduate of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill with a degree in print/broadcast journalism.

Sharon’s debut title, House of Testosterone—One Mom’s Survival in a Household of Males, was named a notable book by IndieBound. From 1998-2010, she wrote a regular column for The Cary News that won several statewide awards in North Carolina. Her writing has also been featured in Good Housekeeping, Better Homes & Gardens, The News & Observer (Raleigh, NC), and Blue Mountain Arts greeting cards.

Sharon lives in Cary, NC with her husband, Kevin, their youngest son, Jason, 17, and their 13-year-old long-haired dachshund, with frequent visits from sons Bill, 26, and David, 24. In addition to her own websites, Sharon is a blogger for www.motherhoodlater.com, the leading website for older moms. Visit Sharon's website at https://www.sharonodonnellauthor.com/.

Visit Author Website     Sharon's WRAL Interview

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PTA 800

A rare sighting of a Waffle boy sends young Pancake Jake on a quest in Breakfast Land: he wants to make friends with the Waffles who have long been the enemies of the Pancakes. With courage and kindness, Jake discovers a long-lost recipe that proves Pancakes and Waffles are actually made of the same ingredients.

The charming illustrations and playful text make for a fun read that will encourage important conversations about diversity, equity, and inclusion.

The author is donating a portion of her royalties to The Conscious Kid, an education, research, and policy organization dedicated to equity and promoting healthy racial identity development in youth. The Conscious Kid supports  organizations, families, and educators in taking action to disrupt racism in young  children.

 

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PTA 800Motherhood is not what it used to be, as more moms than ever before are having children later on in life.

This is the must-have book for all moms who had a child after the age of 35—a group the medical profession not-so-kindly calls—‘advanced maternal age.’

Sharon O’Donnell writes about the humorous and poignant stories of having a child at 38 and how she discovered that breastfeeding and AARP membership aren’t really all that far apart.

Sharon says being a mom of a certain age can be tough and rewarding—and rather alarming when you realize that all the TV programs you watch have commercials for incontinence or the Scooter Store.

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